COVID-19 Committee Statements (20-21/21-22)

Statement for UO personnel committees conducting major reviews except for promotion-and-tenure from assistant to associate professor (beginning in AY20-21) 

The UO recognizes that faculty research may have been interrupted, interfered with, and/or impeded during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The results of the “Survey on Faculty Research and Creative Practice” (August 2020) is available here. Productivity may have been negatively impacted by illness, stress, and unanticipated caregiving responsibilities. Research suggests that faculty of color and female faculty may have been disproportionately affected.

The impact may have been compounded and exacerbated by unforeseen professional challenges. Research plans have been upended; labs, libraries, field sites have been closed; conferences and professional association meetings have been cancelled or postponed; and the review processes of journals and university presses have been delayed significantly. Furthermore, the transition to remote teaching has disrupted already developed research schedules and plans while the mentorship of students affected by converging public health, economic, and social crises has been emotionally demanding.   

The Office of the Provost encourages faculty members undergoing major reviews to describe the impact of COVID-19 in their research, teaching, service, and equity statements. The Office of the Provost asks committees conducting reviews to remain cognizant of, and sensitive to, COVID-related disruptions in their consideration of dossiers.  

Statement for promotion-and-tenure reviews (to be sent to external reviewers beginning in the AY21-22 cycle and department- and school-/college-level personnel committees in the AY21-22 cycle)

The UO recognizes that faculty research may have been interrupted, interfered with, and/or impeded during the ongoing COVID pandemic. The results of the “Survey on Faculty Research and Creative Practice” (August 2020) is available here. Productivity may have been negatively impacted by illness, stress, or unanticipated caregiving responsibilities. Research suggests that faculty of color and female faculty may have been disproportionately affected.

The impact may have been compounded and exacerbated by unforeseen professional challenges. Research plans have been upended; labs, libraries, field sites have been closed; conferences and professional association meetings have been cancelled or postponed; and the review processes of journals and university presses have been delayed significantly. Furthermore, the transition to remote teaching has disrupted already developed research schedules and plans while the mentorship of students affected by converging public health, economic, and social crises has been emotionally demanding.

Recognizing these facts, the Office of the Provost has permitted faculty to request a one-year tenure clock extension. The evaluation of research productivity of a faculty member who received a COVID-related extension assumes the faculty member has been in probationary status for the normal pre-tenure period of five years. Therefore, an extension should not be treated as “extra time” in that it should not raise promotion-and-tenure expectations. Rather, an extension should be understood as a way to account for potential delays resulting from COVID-related obstacles to research productivity.

FOR EXTERNAL REVIEWERS: Furthermore, the Office of the Provost has encouraged faculty members undergoing tenure-and-promotion review to describe the impact of COVID-19 in their research, teaching, service, and equity statements. The Office of the Provost requests that external reviewers evaluating dossiers remain cognizant of, and sensitive to, COVID-related disruptions.

FOR UO COMMITTEES: Furthermore, the Office of the Provost has encouraged faculty members undergoing tenure-and-promotion review to describe the impact of COVID-19 in their research, teaching, service, and equity statements. The Office of the Provost asks that committees conducting reviews remain cognizant of, and sensitive to, COVID-related disruptions.